Testosterone protein synthesis

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced in large amounts by males (and a little bit in females), in the testes and adrenal glands. High testosterone levels are associated with sexual performance, reproductive function, muscle mass, hair growth, aggressive, competitive behaviors, and other such manly things. Testosterone levels tend to peak at the age of 40, and slowly decline from there. Luckily, there are many things you can do to increase testosterone, so if you feel like your T levels could use a boost, you've come to the right place.

The last, but certainly not the least, macronutrient to be concerned about is fat. You’ll want to get about 30% of your total calories from fat, but don’t overload on polyunsaturated fats like those found in salmon, other fatty fish and vegetable oils. Instead, concentrate on choosing monounsaturated fats found in nuts, olives, olive oil and avocados, and saturated fats from red meat and egg yolks. Unorthodox as this advice may be, research suggests that polyunsaturated fats lower testosterone levels, while monounsaturated and even saturated fats raise T levels.

However, other research shows that, in some cases at least, whey may actually lower testosterone after a workout (with weights).  The first hint of this actually came in 2005 when researchers gave men - again doing heavy resistance training - a mixture of whey and caseinate.  They found that both post-exercise growth hormone and testosterone levels were higher in men consuming a placebo than men consuming this protein mixture that included whey. [3] Of course, one wants those testosterone increases and so this was undoubtedly a bit concerning. 

Though you may already be aware of potential side effects from testosterone abuse (note I said abuse and not use), here they are again: lowered HDL-cholesterol levels (good cholesterol), testicular atrophy, reductions in sperm count, prostate enlargement, liver damage (primarily with oral steroids that have been modified with a 17-alkyl substitution), menstrual irregularities, suppression of endogenous hormone levels (like LH and T), development of palpable breast tissue in men (also known as gynecomastia), clitoral enlargement, and acne.

Testosterone protein synthesis

testosterone protein synthesis

Though you may already be aware of potential side effects from testosterone abuse (note I said abuse and not use), here they are again: lowered HDL-cholesterol levels (good cholesterol), testicular atrophy, reductions in sperm count, prostate enlargement, liver damage (primarily with oral steroids that have been modified with a 17-alkyl substitution), menstrual irregularities, suppression of endogenous hormone levels (like LH and T), development of palpable breast tissue in men (also known as gynecomastia), clitoral enlargement, and acne.

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