Loss of testosterone effects

If testosterone deficiency occurs during fetal development, then male characteristics may not completely develop. If testosterone deficiency occurs during puberty, a boy’s growth may slow and no growth spurt will be seen. The child may have reduced development of pubic hair, growth of the penis and testes, and deepening of the voice. Around the time of puberty, boys with too little testosterone may also have less than normal strength and endurance, and their arms and legs may continue to grow out of proportion with the rest of their body.

Men suffering from hair loss generally have elevated levels of a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in their scalp. DHT is a chemical by-product of the male hormone testosterone. When testosterone gets converted to DHT in the scalp, the result is hair loss. Procerin's active ingredients are specifically formulated to block this transformation into DHT, and stop the hair loss that DHT causes.

Procerin blocks DHT without reacting with testosterone (as some prescription medications do). This can stop the further loss of hair from the scalp without the sexual side effects of prescription drugs like finasteride (Propecia). Men of all ages, and all levels of hair loss, can benefit from Procerin. Whether you are concerned about stopping hair loss before it becomes a problem, or already have significant loss of hair, Procerin can help.

In order to understand the role testosterone plays in hair loss, it’s important to get acquainted with dihydrotestosterone (DHT), one of many testosterone byproducts that, during puberty, helps develop male characteristics such as facial hair. It is estimated that around 5% of a guy’s testosterone is converted into DHT. “DHT is a very potent male hormone,” says Lyons. “It is converted from testosterone via an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase. If you have a genetic predisposition to male pattern hair loss, DHT can be a catalyst for hair thinning.”

As a counselor and a man, I currently believe men’s issues aren’t spoken of too widely whereas women’s issues are much more popularly known. Also, I think men tend to be much more private and reclusive about talking and/or getting help whereas women may be more likely and it is more socially acceptable. Also, as you point out, women internalize and ask what they did. Again, I think natural emotional tendancies and gender stereotypes are at play here. Maybe they can instead realize the situation and ask, “what can I do (to help)?” That’s the way relationships work, our partner’s problems are ours and vice versa.

Loss of testosterone effects

loss of testosterone effects

As a counselor and a man, I currently believe men’s issues aren’t spoken of too widely whereas women’s issues are much more popularly known. Also, I think men tend to be much more private and reclusive about talking and/or getting help whereas women may be more likely and it is more socially acceptable. Also, as you point out, women internalize and ask what they did. Again, I think natural emotional tendancies and gender stereotypes are at play here. Maybe they can instead realize the situation and ask, “what can I do (to help)?” That’s the way relationships work, our partner’s problems are ours and vice versa.

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