Eq pedal in effects chain

Effects are often incorporated into amplifiers and even some types of instruments. Electric guitar amplifiers typically have built-in reverb and distortion , while acoustic guitar and keyboard amplifiers tend to only have built-in reverb. Some acoustic instrument amplifiers have reverb, chorus, compression and equalization (bass and treble) effects. Vintage guitar amps (and their 2010-era reissued models) typically have tremolo and vibrato effects, and sometimes reverb. The Fender Bandmaster Reverb amp, for example, had built-in reverb and vibrato. Built-in effects may offer the user less control than standalone pedals or rackmounted units. For example, on some lower- to mid-priced bass amplifiers , the only control on the audio compression effect is a button or switch to turn it on or off, or a single knob. In contrast, a pedal or rackmounted unit would typically provide ratio, threshold and attack knobs and sometimes "soft knee" or other options to allow the user to control the compression.

In terms of how the effects and amp models sound, we give the Zoom G3X a 7 out of 10. Most effects sound great and very convincing. All but the most discerning tone snobs would be able to distinguish them from the “real thing.” As is typical for digital multi-effects units, the quality of the overdrive and distortion effects is sub-par. Conversely, delays, reverbs, and choruses sound pretty great . In fact, one recommendation many users make is to start out with the Zoom G3X, and eventually buy a separate dedicated overdrive or distortion pedal, like a Fulltone OCD or Pro Co RAT2. This comment from an owner sums it up well:

Modulation stompboxes like our BF-3 Flanger should be after the tone-producing effects like distortion, wah, etc. so they can process and modify the tone built by the pedals before it. If you put it before the distortion, then you are distorting the sound of the flanger. Maybe that’s what you’re after, but in general, put the BF-3 and other modulation effects after the tone-shaping (and noise–producing) pedals. And then there are the ambience effects: delay and reverb. As we discussed earlier , reverb—and sometimes delay, depending on the space—is the last thing that happens before the sound reaches your ears in a physical space, so these go last. Delaying reverb can sound muddy, so it’s usually better to have the reverb after the delay.

First think about what you want to accomplish. Do you want to equalize the sound of the guitar that's feeding into the distortion pedal, or sculpt the sound that is coming out of it? EQ pedals can go practically anywhere in your pedal chain, but they will respond differently depending on where they are positioned relative to your other pedals. For example, if you place an EQ before a distortion pedal (Figure 3), you can control the frequencies that will be clipped. Anything you boost on the EQ pedal will receive more "grit" from the dirt pedal, and anything you cut will be less distorted. If you place an EQ after a distortion pedal (Figure 4), the EQ will act more as an overall tone control; affecting the balance of the sound overall, and having no real effect on the amount of clipping--only the relative frequency balance of the final sound. You can use this to your advantage. For example, the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi is a well loved fuzz pedal with a huge low frequency response, but the midrange can be a little "soft"; an EQ pedal in front of it in the chain can be used to tame the bottom and bring the mids out a bit more so the guitar "cuts through" better onstage or in a mix. The Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer oevrdrive has the opposite EQ sound - a boosted midrange "hump" and less in the low frequency range… try placing an EQ pedal after it in the chain and adding a bit of bass and pulling the mids back a touch to balance out the sound.

Eq pedal in effects chain

eq pedal in effects chain

First think about what you want to accomplish. Do you want to equalize the sound of the guitar that's feeding into the distortion pedal, or sculpt the sound that is coming out of it? EQ pedals can go practically anywhere in your pedal chain, but they will respond differently depending on where they are positioned relative to your other pedals. For example, if you place an EQ before a distortion pedal (Figure 3), you can control the frequencies that will be clipped. Anything you boost on the EQ pedal will receive more "grit" from the dirt pedal, and anything you cut will be less distorted. If you place an EQ after a distortion pedal (Figure 4), the EQ will act more as an overall tone control; affecting the balance of the sound overall, and having no real effect on the amount of clipping--only the relative frequency balance of the final sound. You can use this to your advantage. For example, the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi is a well loved fuzz pedal with a huge low frequency response, but the midrange can be a little "soft"; an EQ pedal in front of it in the chain can be used to tame the bottom and bring the mids out a bit more so the guitar "cuts through" better onstage or in a mix. The Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer oevrdrive has the opposite EQ sound - a boosted midrange "hump" and less in the low frequency range… try placing an EQ pedal after it in the chain and adding a bit of bass and pulling the mids back a touch to balance out the sound.

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